NPC Firewood

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Cell (916) 871-3159
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Firewood Tips

How to purchase

Although there are a variety of measuring units, firewood is normally sold by the cord, or a fraction of a cord. The dimensions of a "standard cord" is a stack of wood piled 8 feet long, 4 feet wide and 4 feet high.

You won't get a full 128 cubic feet of firewood with a standard cord because of the airspace between the pieces of the wood; the amount of wood in such a stack will depend upon the size and straightness of the pieces, how they are split and how the wood is stacked. Because of this, the total cubic feet in a cord can vary from 70 to 90 or more cubic feet.

The cost of firewood varies according to the number of services a wood dealer furnishes -- tasks such as splitting, delivering and stacking. The cost also varies in different geographical areas.

Orders for the purchase and delivery of firewood should be placed well in advance of the heating season. Wood purchased during the peak periods is in more demand and becomes more expensive. You will also want to purchase early to give the wood time to season.
 

Seasoned Wood

Seasoning takes place when the moisture content in wood reaches equilibrium with the moisture in the surrounding air.

When wood is stacked outdoors with good air circulation in a spot that's dry, sunny and open for about six months it will be dry enough to support efficient combustion. Seasoned wood has a higher heating value than green wood. In general, because of its moisture content, a cord of green wood will weigh 70 to 100 percent more than seasoned wood.

The time of year and the size of the wood pieces influences the amount of time that wood takes to season. You can help the process by properly stacking and storing your pile of firewood. The best way is to store it outside, under cover and close to the house for easy access. It should be stacked on a supporting base -- such as cement blocks, pallets or wooden planks. This prevents the wood from drawing moisture from the ground, allows air to circulate around it, reduces insect infestation and cuts down on the amount of dirt in accumulates. End braces or stakes can be used to keep the woodpile from collapsing; they can be built to measure accurately a standard cord.
 

The Best Woods For Burning

In either a wood stove or fireplace, the easiest and best fire is built by using a mixture of both softwoods -- from trees such as pines and firs -- and hardwoods -- oak, eucalyptus, cedar and so on.

Softwoods start burning easily, and the hardwoods provide for long burning and good "coaling" qualities. A bed of ashes underneath the grate produces steady heat and aids in igniting new fuel as it is added. The fire will continue burning if small amounts of wood are added at regular intervals. In fact, more efficient combustion results from burning small loads of wood with sufficient air than from burning large loads with minimal air.

REMINDER: The drier your wood is, the better and cleaner it will burn, and the less creosote buildup you will have. Your stove or chimney cleaning needs will not be as frequent, and above all, you will limit yourself and your family to the minimum risk of having a chimney or stove fire. As always, have your fireplace chimney cleaned every 1-2 years depending on cresote buildup.

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